Joint Venture Silicon Valley provides ANALYSIS, ACTION, LEADERSHIP

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Joint Venture Silicon Valley provides

ANALYSIS

ACTION

LEADERSHIP

What's Happening Now

Tickets available: 2024 State of the Valley Conference, March 1

logoFebruary 12, 2024 - Register now for the 2024 State of the Valley Conference Friday, March 1. The event will be livestreamed from San José State University. Count on the most recent data on the state of the Bay Area and illuminating analysis by experts who will break down the numbers. You can purchase a virtual ticket for $35. Your virtual ticket provides access to all livestream proceedings, the ability to post interactive chats and a PDF version of the 2024 Silicon Valley Index.

Learn more | Register

Rachel Massaro honored by Board of Supervisors

February 12, 2024 - Rachel Massaro, Vice President of Joint Venture, and Director of Research at the Silicon Valley Institute for Regional Studies was honored with a commendation from the Santa Clara County Board of Supervisors for their work. Susan Ellenberg, President of the Board of Supervisors, who presented Massaro with the award called Rachel a “nationally recognized leader in data analysis, including serving as the primary researcher and energetic scholar behind the annual Silicon Valley Index, an essential tool for Silicon Valley leaders across economic sectors for more than 25 years.”

Joint Venture board adopts strategic plan

February 12, 2024 - 2023 marks Joint Venture’s 30-year anniversary. It remains the only organization that gathers leaders and change-makers from across all sectors to spotlight issues, launch projects, and work toward innovative solutions. To mark the anniversary, Joint Venture’s board has adopted a new strategic plan that will double down on its mission and set off a capacity-building effort over the next five years with three distinct pillars: to grow research expertise; to convene the region; and a plan for financial sustainability.

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Institute: GBI modeling shows impact for Santa Clara County families

coverFebruary 12, 2024 - Joint Venture’s Institute has completed a report in partnership with the University of Washington School of Social Work, Center for Women’s Welfare which models guaranteed basic income (GBI) scenarios. Supported by a 2022-23 grant from the County of Santa Clara with additional support from Silicon Valley Community Foundation, Modeling Guaranteed Basic Income & Household Income Adequacy in Santa Clara County examines how GBI programs can help move families out of poverty and into economic security.

Read the report

Meet Barry Vesser, The Climate Center

February 12, 2024 - Carl Sagan once said, “Anything else you’re interested in is not going to happen if you can’t breathe the air and drink the water. Don’t sit this one out. Do something." Barry Vesser, COO of the Climate Center, has taken this sentiment to heart. Barry leads The Climate Center’s program and policy development and implementation teams. Barry moved around a great deal as a young man and served in the Peace Corps in the Philippines where he was inspired by the sense of community and kindness that was expressed by people of modest means. 

Read the profile

Silicon Valley Indicators

indicators home page Comprehensive information and data about the Silicon Valley ecosystem is always available at www.siliconvalleyindicators.org.

Data and charts from the Silicon Valley Index (and more) are presented on an interactive website that allows users to explore Silicon Valley trends. Indicators are presented by the Institute for Regional Studies. Housed within Joint Venture Silicon Valley, the Institute provides data and analysis on issues facing dense metropolitan regions.

What is Joint Venture Silicon Valley?

Established in 1993, Joint Venture provides data and analysis on issues affecting the Silicon Valley economy and quality of life. The organization convenes established and emerging leaders—from business, government, academia, labor and the broader community—to spotlight issues, and work collaboratively toward innovative solutions.

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My first memory of an election was when I walked precincts in east Los Angeles with my mother in 1964. At six, I had no understanding of the bigger picture. What I did understand was that mom was passionate about GOP candidate Barry Goldwater for president. The language of politics was embedded early and established a level of comfort in a discourse that unnerves many. And it provided a model that I set with my own children.

Goldwater, considered a right-wing extremist at the time, ran with the slogan in your heart you know he’s right, as Lyndon Baines Johnson punched back with, in your guts, you know he’s nuts. Of course, LBJ won the general election by a landslide.

Through the years I was mom’s tag-along for many campaigns: Sam Yorty for Mayor, John Rousselot for Congress, George Deukemeijan for Governor, George Wallace for president. I even made it to Ronald Reagan’s presidential victory party at the Century Plaza Hotel.

My own politics took a 180-degree turn from mom’s extreme John Birch Society bent. But I did grow up believing that politics should be dinner-table conversation. That civil, respectful dialogue allows us to reach across differences so we may learn from one another. Regrettably, that sort of dialogue is on the wane.

I voted for the first time in 1976 and I have never missed an election. I have voted in cities across California, large and small. I’ve never had to stand in line or been questioned about my access to the ballot box. But I am white and educated. If challenged, I would not walk away – you’d get a ruckus from me.

At the dinner table with my own children, we encouraged open dialogue on political issues. We went to city council meetings, circulated petitions, wrote letters and campaigned for candidates we believed in. It stuck. We have two sons who are active in politics: one as a volunteer on climate issues, and one who is a paid staffer on public policy. Both are fully committed to working toward the outcomes they believe in.

This election, I have addressed hundreds of nonpartisan letters and postcards to swing state voters urging them to vote early. I will be phone banking too. I see signs that others are doing the same, and I’m encouraged. But I still worry about the impact of cynicism and disdain for the political process.

Please exercise your right to vote. Our elections have consequences for our nation and for our community. Remember, the closer an election is, the more likely it is that the outcome will be taken out of the voters' hands. That’s a scenario most vividly exemplified by the 2000 presidential race that came down to a handful of voters. Their names were Kennedy, O'Connor, Rehnquist, Scalia, and Thomas.

About the Author

Robin Doran is the Vice President of Communications at Joint Venture. You can learn more about Robin on her bio page.

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In The News

February 20, 2024 - (San Jose Spotlight) - How many Santa Clara County tech workers have been laid off? ...hiring spiked the region’s market cap to an unheard $16 trillion, according to Russell Hancock, CEO of Joint Venture Silicon Valley More

February 18, 2024 - (Silicon Valley) - Bay Area tech layoffs finally start to weigh down region’s job market: Tech companies seek heightened efficiency, said Russell Hancock, CEO of Joint Venture Silicon Valley More

February 14, 2024 - (EdSource) - California parents pay among the highest costs for child care: Child care in techie Silicon Valley is even costlier...according to the 2023 Joint Venture Silicon Valley Index. More

February 14, 2024 - (San Jose Spotlight) - Silicon Valley parents face highest child care costs: Child care in Silicon Valley is even more costly...according to the 2023 Joint Venture Silicon Valley Index. More

February 9, 2024 - (Mercury News) - Pure Storage, Google, mobile games company trim Bay Area jobs as tech cutbacks widen: “Tech companies hired too many people during the pandemic, and now we are seeing right-sizing,” said Russell Hancock, president of Joint Venture Silicon Valley...More

January 24, 2024 - (NBC) - Bay Area tech layoffs continue despite overall economy getting AI-related boost: "...This happens over and over, it's been our story for 80 years," said Russell Hancock, CEO of Joint Venture Silicon Valley. More

January 19, 2024 - (Mercury News) - Bay Area job market surges with big December gains to cap off 2023: “The job numbers are impressive but not surprising,” said Russell Hancock, president of Joint Venture Silicon Valley More

January 16, 2024 - (New York Post) - Tech moguls ‘optimistic’ about San Francisco despite sprawling urban decay: “San Francisco is vibrant. It’s a magnificent city,” Russell Hancock, president and chief executive of the think tank Joint Venture Silicon Valley More

January 16, 2024 - (Los Angeles Times) - All is lost in San Francisco? City loyalists take issue with naysayers. Data may back them up: Russell Hancock, CEO of Joint Venture Silicon Valley, said most disagree that San Francisco has somehow lost its allure. More

January 8, 2024 - (Silicon Valley) - Housing projects supplant Bay Area offices, stores as tech boom fades: “We will see how the housing conversions work out,” said Russell Hancock, president of Joint Venture Silicon Valley More

January 5, 2024 - (Silicon Valley Business Journal) - Economic Forecast: Tech remains king in Silicon Valley - Russell Hancock, president and CEO of Joint Venture Silicon Valley, said tech industry jobs losses also need to be put into perspective. More

January 5, 2024 - (SIlicon Valley Business Journal) - Economic Forecast: Empty offices, smaller projects become the new norm - "...they prefer working in pajamas and staring into a computer screen because they are utility-maximizing people,” said Russell Hancock, CEO of Joint Venture Silicon Valley. More

January 2, 2024 - (Silicon Valley) - Bay Area office vacancies balloon to all-time high as tech wobbles: “Silicon Valley is an innovation economy,” Russell Hancock (CEO of Joint Venture) said. More